Narrowing the Sites and Moving the Targets: Institutional Instability and the Development of a Political Opposition in Kyrgyzstan PDF Print E-mail

Eugene Huskey and Gulnara Iskakova, Stetson University and University of Central Asia

Abstract

Institutional instability has been a central feature of political life in much of the post-communist world. During the last two decades, for example, Kyrgyzstan alone has introduced new constitutions, or introduced significant constitutional changes, seven times: in 1993, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2003, 2007, and 2010. This working paper argues that, not only specific rule changes, but rule changeability has complicated the development of a legitimate and effective opposition. To assess the implications of rule changes and changeability for opposition behavior in this post-communist case, this working paper focuses on institutional instability in Kyrgyzstan in the areas of electoral rules, parliamentary size and structure, and the sub-national sites for political contestation.

 

Contact Information

National Council for Eurasian and East European Research

DC Office
  • 1828 L Street NW Suite 1200
  • Washington, DC 20036
  • Tel: 202-572-9095
  • Tel: 202-572-9125 (alternate)
  • Fax: 866-937-9872
  • E-mail: info@nceeer.org

ac_logo_smallcarnegielogo_smallsd_logo_smallNEH

NCEEER

miffsuzzallopomak_children

National Council for Eurasian and East European Research (NCEEER) is a non-profit organization created in 1978 to develop and sustain long-term, high-quality programs for post-doctoral research on the social, political, economic, environmental, and historical development of Eurasia and Central and Eastern Europe.   More

Latest NCEEER Working Papers

2012_826-14g_Irvine

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doctors' and Parents' Perspectives on Communication Regarding HPV Vaccination in Bulgaria

Elitsa Dimitrova, Yulia Panayotova, Anna Alexandrova-Karamanova, and Irina Todorova

Contextual Constitution of Behavior: Introducing the HPV Vaccine in Eastern Europe

Irina Todorova and Adrian Baban

The Readers of Novyi Mir, 1948-1969: A Social Portrait

Denis Kozlov